Give yourself an A+ for reading this

Image result for teaching assessmentA few years ago I was filling out a mid-semester report for a student regarding eligibility for a Greek organization. She thought she was doing great with a strong “B.” As it happens she was reading the gradebook incorrectly and was squarely in the “D” range. It was a difficult conversation, but she rededicated herself to her work and ended up earning a “B-.” I often tell the story to students to illustrate the importance of accurate self-assessment and the real possibility of improving once you have a good idea about where you are.

A recent article from Faculty Focus takes the strategy a step further in suggesting formalized self-assessment in the first third of the semester. They suggest having students perform a basic assessment (which you can grade credit/no-credit) on attendance, their overall grade, set goals, and several other items. I love this idea as it compels students to be reflective, gives you a better understanding of their self-perception, and gives you a point of reference later in the semester. Of course there are limitations to this in large courses (an issue addressed in the article) or with students who elect not to do the work, but it is an effective strategy within a class and it has the potential to set up good habits for students moving forward. Overall, it is a nice companion to the tip from last week about identifying key markers for success in your courses.

A few reminders for you:
The Academy e-Learning application is live!
Faculty Development is searching for the next director!
We held a popular workshop on Dossier Prep for Lecturers last week. Find the video archive and handouts here.

Dr. Sara Cooper has provided additional Book in Common Material. Check out this section of the CELT page for regular synopsis updates, discussion questions, and other resources.
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2 thoughts on “Give yourself an A+ for reading this

  1. Your Mindful Guide to Academic Success: Beat Burnout

    Gayle Kimball, Ph.D.

    200 pages ISBN 978-0-938795-50-6
    Available on Amazon for $9.99

    This book is a very useful tool for students to be able to handle their independence as a student in college with so many incredible ideas and ways to help them develop into strong individuals. Dr. Kimball has constructed a comprehensive guide that can be just as effective for the first year experience as it can be for seniors preparing to graduate and embark on their professional journey. She supports the holistic individual – emotionally, physically, and socially. Roderica Williams, Ph.D.

    The nine chapters provide information for high school and college students about how to achieve academic goals and reduce stress:

    How to identify your learning styles

    Techniques to achieve your goals

    Study skills and effective test taking

    How to write research papers

    Stress reduction

    Understand mind power

    Clearing emotional blocks to success

    Physical vitality

    Student activism and goals internationally

    Student experiences are featured, along with a variety of experts, and they created the illustrations.

    Like

  2. Your Mindful Guide to Academic Success: Beat Burnout

    Gayle Kimball, Ph.D.

    200 pages ISBN 978-0-938795-50-6
    Available on Amazon for $9.99

    This book is a very useful tool for students to be able to handle their independence as a student in college with so many incredible ideas and ways to help them develop into strong individuals. Dr. Kimball has constructed a comprehensive guide that can be just as effective for the first year experience as it can be for seniors preparing to graduate and embark on their professional journey. She supports the holistic individual – emotionally, physically, and socially. Roderica Williams, Ph.D.

    The nine chapters provide information for high school and college students about how to achieve academic goals and reduce stress:

    How to identify your learning styles

    Techniques to achieve your goals

    Study skills and effective test taking

    How to write research papers

    Stress reduction

    Understand mind power

    Clearing emotional blocks to success

    Physical vitality

    Student activism and goals internationally

    Student experiences are featured, along with a variety of experts, and they created the illustrations.

    Like

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